Natural History Museum’s Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition is coming to Lincoln

Stunning images unveiled as part of the Natural History Museum’s Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition are arriving at The Collection Museum, in Lincoln.

What's On. EMN-210617-165934001
What's On. EMN-210617-165934001

On Saturday, July 3, the world-renowned exhibition on loan from the Natural History Museum in London, will open at The Collection Museum, featuring exceptional images which showcase the breath-taking diversity of the natural world.

Using photography’s unique emotive power to engage and inspire audiences, the images shine a light on stories and species around the world and encourage people to speak up for the planet’s future wellbeing.

Wildlife Photographer of the Year is the most prestigious photography event of its kind, providing a global platform that has showcased the natural world’s most astonishing and challenging sights for over 50 years.

Dr Tim Littlewood, executive director of Science at the Natural History Museum and member of the judging panel, says, “This competition has an outstanding reputation in attracting the world’s very best photographers, naturalists and young photographers.

“There has never been a more vital time for audiences all over the world to re-engage with the natural world, and what better way than this inspiring and provocative exhibition.

“We hope that this year’s exhibition will provide an opportunity for audiences to pause, reflect and ignite a passion of advocating for the natural world.”

Jenny Gleadell, Exhibitions and Interpretation Officer at The Collection, said: “This is a wonderful opportunity to see exceptional images of animals from across the world, showing their fascinating behaviour, spectacular species and the breath-taking diversity of the natural world. We are delighted to bring this exhibition to Lincoln

Booking is advised via www.thecollectionmuseum.com or calling 01522 782040.

Admission prices are: £6 adult, £5 concession, £4 for 16 and under.