Shops and shoppers give thumbs up to trial pedestrianisation in town centre

A six-month trial ban on traffic in Boston’s Strait Bargate, launched in March 1980, was proving popular with shop owners and shoppers.
End of the road ... at least for the next six months. Strait Bargate is closed off in 1980 as part of a trial pedestrianisation.End of the road ... at least for the next six months. Strait Bargate is closed off in 1980 as part of a trial pedestrianisation.
End of the road ... at least for the next six months. Strait Bargate is closed off in 1980 as part of a trial pedestrianisation.

The assistant manager at Curry’s, Gilbert Sands, said: “It’s the most positive move made by the council in 18 years that I have worked in Strait Bargate. It’s good to see them considering the people rather than the vehicles.”

Mr J. Tellam, of Preedy’s stationary shop, said he had seen such systems introduced in his home city of London and was confident that it would work in Boston.

Pauline Kirk, assistant manager of Mackays, said: “It’s certainly much quieter.”

The Wide Bargate end of Strait Bargate.The Wide Bargate end of Strait Bargate.
The Wide Bargate end of Strait Bargate.

Rodney Isaac, of Oldrids, also commented on how peaceful it was in the street, and added he had been amused at the number of people still using the pavements as normal, walking to the edge and looking both ways before crossing the road.

Shopper Mr J. R. Thornton, of Bradford Road, Boston, spoke very highly of the experiment.

“It ought to be extended,” he said.

In the past, pedestrians have been in danger while walking on crowded footpaths, he said, but it was now much safer.

An alternative angle of the other end of Strait Bargate.An alternative angle of the other end of Strait Bargate.
An alternative angle of the other end of Strait Bargate.

Eric Bonsor, of Norfolk Street, Boston, welcomed the car ban, comparing it with the sucessful scheme at Lincoln.

“The lack of car fumes was noticed by Mrs Kathleen Torbitt, of Middlegate Road, Frampton and the extra safety and quiet meant that she was looking forward to her day at the shops,” wrote the Standard. “The introdiction of the experiment co-incided with the inclusion of a bus route running pat her home. A good week for Mrs Torbitt!”

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