New children’s group at Heckington Windmill is a cause for sail-ebration (GALLERY)

A new children’s activity group at Heckington Windmill is sailing ahead.

Education work lead Paul Reid, helping Mason Atkins, 10, Caleb Smith, nine, and Taylor-Jade Smith, 11.
Education work lead Paul Reid, helping Mason Atkins, 10, Caleb Smith, nine, and Taylor-Jade Smith, 11.

Mini Millers launched at the visitor attraction in November for children aged between seven and 11.

It meets monthly on a Sunday morning and has proved so popular that the next session – on February 27 – has already sold out.

Education work lead at the windmill Paul Reid said: “The aim of each session is two fold. First, to teach children something about our unique windmill – how it works, its history and how it is used to turn wheat into flour using natural power. Second, to help children gain a love and understanding of food and to teach them new skills through baking a variety of flour-based items centred around cakes and bread.”

Volunteer Karen Hill, helping Amelia Bassett, eight, and Frankie Atkins, nine.

The February session is the last of the initial four that were announced last year, but a new series of Mini Miller sessions for March to June will be announced early next month, the windmill says.

Early booking is recommended and places can be booked via the Heckington Windmill website.

“The trust has some exciting plans for next three years as we look to expand the range of educational activities for both children and adults across the site,” Paul added. “Mini Millers is just the beginning of these plans.

“It is great to see the resources that we have here at Heckington beginning to be used more widely and it is our hope to build on this in the future with an expanded school-offer and courses for adults.”

Volunteer Susan Lipscombe, helping Jennifer Neasham and Victoria Neasham, 10.

* For more information, visit www.heckingtonwindmill.org.uk/

Harriet Woodcock.
Liliana Jenvey, 11, and Ella Tempest, seven with volunteer Susan Lipscombe.