Search underway for new Lincolnshire homes for Ukrainian refugees

A list of ‘ready homes’ is being drawn up for Ukrainian refugees to prevent some from becoming homeless.

Some Ukrainian refugees in Lincolnshire are seeking alternative accommodation after their first six months in the county.
Some Ukrainian refugees in Lincolnshire are seeking alternative accommodation after their first six months in the county.

The government’s initial sponsorship programme saw guests settled in new homes for a minimum of six months, and not all wish to continue.

Over 900 refugees have settled in Lincolnshire since the war began, with applications submitted for another 400.

Around 80 per cent of the 200 hosts asked so far by Lincolnshire County Council say they are happy to continue with the arrangement.

However, 16 per cent of the family groups might require new accommodation.

Government figures estimate around a quarter of the original sponsors across the UK will not be extending the stay.

The council has contacted nearly 3,000 people who originally said they were willing to take in refugees, but have not yet been matched with one.

Of those who have responded, 371 say they can still offer homes.

DBS checks and accommodation inspections will be carried out to find suitable hosts.

However, prospective hosts in rural areas “may present issues in accessing employment, schools and other services,” a council report says.

“These challenges related to more isolated settings can contribute to arrangements breaking down.

“That said, some rural arrangements are flourishing so we are not wholly discounting these offers.”

It adds that a list of ready homes “may avoid individuals/families having to go into temporary, emergency accommodation for extended periods.”

Extra staff have been recruited in Lincolnshire to ensure that refugees do not fall through the cracks and become homeless.

Over 60 groups have moved into private accommodation without council support, while others have returned to Ukraine.

The council also chipped in to help with school uniform costs after arrivals said it was a strain on their finances.

The report, which is to go before the Adult Care & Community Wellbeing panel next week, says Lincolnshire has had the second highest rate of arrivals in the region.

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