Ros sets sights on Tokyo gold medal

It hasn’t been the summer she had originally planned but Olympic hopeful Ros Canter admits lockdown has allowed her to regain world-beating form while focusing on motherhood.

Ros Canter. EMN-180918-092705002

The 34-year-old, who won individual and team gold at the 2018 World Equestrian Games, was back in competition just a month after giving birth last year, as thoughts of qualification for the Tokyo Games dominated her mind.

Although the coronavirus pandemic brought the new equestrian season to a halt in March, Canter – who is one of more than 1,100 elite athletes on UK Sport’s World Class Programme, funded by the National Lottery – has been busy at work both in and out of her sport since then.

“Apart from going to the competitions, life has been quite normal for us,” she said. “With my family and my horses all on the same site, we’ve been very fortunate to have not been hugely affected by the coronavirus.

“Perhaps one of the positives of the situation is that I’ve had more time with my daughter, Ziggy, than I anticipated. It’s been lovely to spend time with her and see her grow.

“At the same time, I’ve been able to do my job as an athlete and get back to exactly how I felt before, so it’s probably made me realise that I can do both things at the same time.”

Having enjoyed a taste of the Games as part of the Ambition Programme four years ago, Canter is desperate for a seat on the plane to Japan nex year.

As equestrian gradually returns to the sporting calendar, the former eventing world number one expects the coming together of the world’s nations to be particularly significant next summer, while she acknowledges that her journey to Japan wouldn’t be possible without the contribution of crucial funding.

She said: “Going to the Olympics would be a dream come true. I always watched it on TV growing up and until a couple of years ago I never thought it was realistically possible. Now, if I go, I want to win gold. I feel back to 100 per cent now, and I’m looking forward to getting back in the saddle. There was a bit of concern over my horse – Allstar B – because he isn’t getting any younger, but he’s on great form at the moment so hopefully he continues performing strongly into next year.

“It will be very special next year and I think it will become more than a sporting event because it will symbolise the world moving on together.”