Pilgrim Trail launching at historical sites across Lincolnshire and Nottinghamshire

Historic sites across Lincolnshire and Nottinghamshire will be opening specially to officially launch the Pilgrim Trail, which celebrates the extraordinary courage and determination of people who sailed on the Mayflower in 1620.

Coun Jo White, deputy leader at Bassetlaw District Council, with the Interpretation Board in Sturton-le-Steeple
Coun Jo White, deputy leader at Bassetlaw District Council, with the Interpretation Board in Sturton-le-Steeple

As part of the Pilgrim Roots project, funded by the National Lottery Heritage Fund and Arts Council England, Interpretation Boards telling the Pilgrims’ story are now in place across the region including Gainsborough and Sturton-le-Steeple.

Events will be taking place at churches along the Pilgrim Trail, including talks by local experts and a chance to meet the Pilgrims Embroiderers, and the Babworth Arts Festival.

On Saturday, November 19, at St Peter and St Paul's Church in Sturton le Steeple there will be guided tours of the church from 10am to 3pm

Coun Jo White, deputy leader at Bassetlaw District Council said: “Pilgrim Roots and the Wampanoag Perspective have been fantastic projects to delve into our hidden histories relating to migration, freedom and tolerance.

“As well as events and exhibitions, the Wampanoag nation from America visited and built a traditional house, called a Wetu, in Bassetlaw Museum Garden. But it isn’t over.

"The Pilgrims Trail will enable people to explore the story in their own time at their own pace and education resources are available from Bassetlaw Museum.

“There is also a permanent gallery at the museum and the Wampanoag Wetu will remain in the garden for the coming year. Thank you to all who play the National Lottery. You made this possible.”

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Pilgrim Roots tells a story of defiance, danger and death before finding a haven in a New World. It details the lives of William and Mary Brewster from Scrooby, William Bradford from Austerfield and John Robinson from Sturton-le-Steeple.

The project also focuses on the devastating impact the settlers had on the native American nations and in 2021, members of the Wampanoag Nation visited Retford to tell their story.

Visit www.pilgrimroots.co.uk or www.bassetlawmuseum.org.uk for more details.