Review: Top marks as Sleaford Little Theatre performs Macbeth

Andy Canadine (front), with witches Tony Gordon and Linda Mallet. Photo: Craig PakesAndy Canadine (front), with witches Tony Gordon and Linda Mallet. Photo: Craig Pakes
Andy Canadine (front), with witches Tony Gordon and Linda Mallet. Photo: Craig Pakes
Review by Andy Hubbert:

“Tomorrow, tomorrow and tomorrow...” After Covid’s obstacles creating delays, Sleaford Little Theatre has delivered a strong third foray into the world of the Bard, putting on William Shakespeare’s Macbeth at The Playhouse.

The weighty play was stripped down to a smaller cast and stage but did not lack in big performances.

Hide Ad
Hide Ad

Outstanding were leading actors Andy Canadine and Helen Pack as Macbeth and Lady Macbeth, whose attention to detail was unwavering. Canadine’s growing madness and interaction with the witches was intense while Lady Macbeth’s murderous ambition descending into madness were enthralling.

A deadly match - Helen Pack and Andy Canadine in Macbeth. Photo: Craig PakesA deadly match - Helen Pack and Andy Canadine in Macbeth. Photo: Craig Pakes
A deadly match - Helen Pack and Andy Canadine in Macbeth. Photo: Craig Pakes

There was sound support from Caroline Johnson as Banquo, complete with deathly garb as his ghost, as well as devillish Hecate.

Briony Sparrow who had the task of playing both Macduff and then his own wife – both were convincingly done with great expression and conviction that held everyone’s attention.

The direction made good use of the whole theatre, with actors appearing among the audience, giving an immersive experience while the staging was sombre and stark but multi-functional.

Hide Ad
Hide Ad

The three witches were naturally integral to the play and drew us back to their mischievous thread, uttering those immortal lines of “bubble, bubble”. And young faces Eliza Hughes and Ruby Hughes produced performances in numerous supporting roles that belied their youth.